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Wednesday: New Bike, Same Old Hump Day

You heard it right. New bike day has dawned at Surly Intergalactic Regional HQ with the unveiling of Wednesday... the bike not the day. It's called Wednesday. You know, cuz Pugsley. Get it? You might be wondering what this new bike is all about and that's why I am writing this blog. We've had this bike in development for a good long time and a lot of thought was put into this frame. That's what we do here, put lots of thought into frame design. People might look at the Wednesday and easily come to the conclusion that this frame is simply a Pugsley with a symmetrical rear end but those poeple would not be doing justice to the bike. The truth about Wednesday—the bike, not the day—is that it is the latest iteration of thought from people that have been designing Omniterra bikes for a very, very long time. There's a lot of nuance and nerdery in this frame that I'd like to point out, and I'm going to do that by showing where it sits compared to the Pugsley and Ice Cream Truck. A lot of people are familiar with those bikes so lets have a look.

The idea with this bike was a do all machine, like the Pugsley, that uses a symetrical rear end and and front fork that also takes advantage of all the new ideas about trail geoemtry and the technology that has become available for Omniterra bikes. We are specing our new tubeless compatible 'My Other Brother Darryl' rims on this bike, along with a 44mm headtube and 26 x 3.8 Nate tires. It's pretty rad. Check the stats below.

Wednesday:

177mm centered rear spacing

100mm threaded BB shell

Adjustable 435 – 455mm rear stays

69 deg Head tube angle rigid / 68 deg Head tube angle with 100mm travel suspension fork

44mm Head Tube / Bluto Clearance on down tube

Room for 4.6" tires on 80mm rims

150 x 15mm thru axle Rigid Fork with dual Anything Cage mounts

30.9mm Seat Tube with internal dropper routing

Tubeless Compatible Surly MyOBD rims

Cast one piece thru axle dropout 

Compatible with 10mm QR wheels with Surly adaptors

 

How it’s different from the Pugsley:

Centered 177mm vs 135mm offset rear spacing

Stronger frame, but not much heavier

Bluto compatible

Thru axle compatible

More ‘neutral’ MTB Geometry vs ‘classic’ XC Geo

Internal cable routing for a dropper post

Increased tire clearance—will fit 4.6" tires on 80mm rims @ 445mm RC (10mm back in dropout)

435–455mm (Wed) vs 448-473mm (Pug) chainstay length

Longer Effective Top Tube measurement

Increased standover (shorter seat tubes, seat tube gusset)

 

How it’s different from the ICT:

177mm centered vs 197mm centered rear  spacing

Cast Thru axle dropout vs MDS system

100mm threaded BB shell vs 132mm pressfit

Less tire clearance

Lighter, more traditional tubeset, smaller stays, more forgiving ride

Shorter Wheelbase (435mm vs 450 RC and 69 vs 68 HTA)

Internal Dropper Routing

Shorter Rigid Fork

Same standover, no seat tube gusset (slightly shorter seat tube)

As you can see, our engineers have made a true Swiss Army Omniterra bike with Wednesday. You want a bike you can take out on a long bikepacking excursion? Run it with the rigid fork and you have brazeons aplenty with a quicker handling, 69 degree headangle and neutral trail geometry. Want to take it out to the trails and get all rad? Stick a bluto on it and you've got a bike that can shred with the likes of the Ice Cream Truck. It can swing bikepacking, trail riding, however you decide to do it. And furthermore, you'll be super happy because you'll be riding a bike and doing fun shit.

Now for the action shots: 

Here's one of our enginerds running the Wednesday down a ski hill just outside Minneapolis. One of the best features of the Wednesday is it's ability to have a 68 degree head angle when you use a 100mm bluto or run the rigid fork with a 69 degree head angle. It can run 3.8 to 4.6" tires on 80mm rims, has internal dropper post cable routing, brazeons everywhere and has horizontal sliding dropouts so you can adjust chainstay length. 

Andy absolutely hates it when his tires are on the ground – he always says, 'it's not natural,' then looks all dejected and bummed out by the thought of his tires touching the dirt. 

This thing is live on the website now so you can check out all the details. MSRP on this puppy is a paltry 1500.00USD so it's a pretty cheap ticket to ride. We'll have them in stock late Oct./early Nov. so head to your local bike shop and ask them for one, then start counting the days. 

Now go ride your bike.

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About Boliver and Company

Customer service in the world of bicycles never had a better friend than it has in Ben. Highly knowledgeable about bikes and wise to the ways of humans, Ben is first contact for seekers of free things, advertising sales people, assorted weirdos and customers. But even more important, on group rides he sometimes pulls out of his bag a bundle of cold fried chicken wrapped in foil. To share! Now that’s something.

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